Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Artichauts / Artie Shaw

Coustellet Sunday farmers marketStill at the Sunday farmers market, now focusing on the artichokes Kim in Seattle cleverly noticed a couple of days ago next to my strawberries of November 8th. If you don't already know Kim, do go and have a look at her blog Seattle Daily Photo. I regard her as one of the most talented photographers in the City Daily Photo web ring. Here's to you Kim!

Toujours au marché paysan de Coustellet, gros plan sur les artichauts que Kim de Seattle avait finement remarqué près de mes fraises d'avant-hier. Si vous ne connaissez pas encore Kim, je vous conseille d'aller jeter un coup d'oeil à son blog Seattle Daily Photo. J'aime beaucoup ce qu'elle fait, je la considère comme l'une des meilleures photographes du réseau City Daily Photo. Bien à toi, Kim !

And on a tangent, just a fun piece of information for my English speaking reading friends : the French word for artichoke is artichaut, which is pronounced pretty much like Artie Shaw - (listen to him here in 'Everything is jumping' 1940). Try as I might, every time I hear his name I can't help but smile : how weird it is to be called artichoke! Would you choose Cawlie Flower as a stage name? :-)))

Et une parenthèse qui prend la tangente : vous avez certainement remarqué mot artichaut (artichoke en anglais) prononcé avec l'accent anglais ressemble furieusement à Artie Shaw, jazzman américain que vous pouvez écouter ici en vidéo dans "Everything is jumping" (1940). Vous avez sûrement déjà pensé comme moi que c'est bien drôle de s'appeler artichaut ! Ce qui de fil en aiguille m'amène à cette blague qu'on se racontait quand j'étais petite : "Le pape est mort. Un autre pape est appelé à régner. Araignée ? Quel drôle de nom ! Pourquoi pas libellule ou papillon ? Ha ha ha, rions trois fois et recommençons-la." Comme quoi l'artichaut mène à tout, de Seattle aux cours d'école en passant par le jazz et le pape...

17 comments:

Avignon said...

De Bretagne ou de Provence ?

Esucob said...

C'est meilleur archi-chaud.

Dimple said...

I grew up eating these delicious flower buds. Yum!

Drew said...

One of my favorite foods.

Owen said...

And I'll bet you bought a few to start practicing for the artichoke throwing contest next Summer ?

brigetoun said...

me ferait aimer les artichauts dont mon enfance pré-hyèroise m'a dégoûtée

Sharon said...

Wonderful photos. I can just taste the butter on those leaves. Also, love the Artie Shaw!

claude said...

Artie Shaw, c'est lui qui porte un drôle de nom. A-t-il au moins manger déjà un artichoke de Bretagne ou de Provence, hein !
Je repasserai écouter la vidéo, Mon Chéri is sleeping.

Jilly said...

I fell about reading that artichaut sounds like Artie Shaw - of course you are right but it still made me laugh out loud. Love the photos, mouthwatering. And I so agree with you about Kim in Seattle. She is indeed one of the most talented photographers in the CDP family. She also gives such kind and encouraging and constructive comments. I love to read her comments, not just on my blogs, but on others. One good lady. Like you, my dear Nathalie.

booksandacupofcoffee said...

Bonjour! Nathalie,
Thanks, for sharing two interesting photographs...and photographer Kim's link to the Seattle Daily Photo...

Nathalie said,"Would you choose Cawlie Flower as a stage name?"
Hmmm...maybe?!?...I remember the word being used in a now classic film that my mother purchased called...Stage Door?!?

DeeDee ;-D

Thérèse said...

Tes commentaires sont extras... je vais être en forme pour la journée.

Books, said...

Bonjour! Nathalie,
Oops! my mère said, those were Calla Lilies! NOT! Cawlie Flowers that were mentioned in the classic film...
STAGE DOOR...
...I'am so sorry!
DeeDee :-(

jeff said...

L'artichaut...
..."L'artichaut, c'est un plat de pauvre, car c'est le seul légume où t'en a plus après l'avoir manger qu'avant"...:-)))... disait Coluche...

Bises,
Jeff

donna said...

i live in southern california, and the best U.S. artichokes come from the Salinas Valley in central california.....i have eaten them for more than 50 years.....we prefer to put a little lemon in the water when we cook them and mix lemon with the butter we dip them into.....those are beautiful artichokes!!!

Kim said...

Nathalie,
How sweet of you to post this today! Thank you so much for mentioning SDP and for your very kind remarks. I am blushing. And, right back at cha! I would like to be as good as you one day.

My parents used to tease me when I was child that, if given the choice, I would pick artichokes over ice cream for dessert, I love them so much. Our family offers clarified butter or mayonnaise to dip the leaves. And I must agree with Donna about the artichokes from Watsonville on the Northern California coast, self-proclaimed artichoke capital of the world. My father also grew a few in our southern California back yard. I even have a fridge magnet of an artichoke in the kitchen. . . Thanks so much again for this special treat!
-Kim

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Richard Schatz said...

Excellent pictures of the "choks". I took some shots in a market in Marseille last week and they don't have the "cojones" of these photos.

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